skip to Main Content

Persuasive Speech Outline Template on Child abuse Your Name: COMS 101 Section __

Please note that this is just a preview of a school assignment posted on our website by one of our clients. If you need assistance with this question too, please click on the Learn More button at the bottom of the page to get started.

Persuasive Speech Outline Template on Child abuse
Your Name:
COMS 101 Section ___
Date Due:
Organization: Identify your outline pattern here. Your only options for this speech is Problem-Solution or Problem-Cause-Solution patterns (see course readings, ch. 14).
Audience analysis: Provide a description of your audience (e.g., its demographics like age, gender, ethnicity, etc. as well as any other information about them that impacts the way you plan and present the speech (see course readings, ch. 4).
Topic: In 1 or 2 sentences, identify the social problem for which you aim to prescribe a redemptive remedy in this speech (see the Persuasive Outline and Speech Instructions document). 
General Goal: To persuade my audience to _____ in response to this presentation on _______ [the social problem that you will estaliblish in this speech and for which you will propose and justify a solution] Specific Goal: I want to inform my audience about the social problem of ______ [identify the topic here] and to persuade them that ______ is a good solution for this problem for several reasons, one of which is the fact that this solution, if successful, will promote ______, which is something that God values according to Scripture. (see course readings, ch. 4) 
I. Get Attention
Use an attention-getter to introduce the topic (see course readings, ch. 8).
II. Establish Relevance
Show the audience how this topic relates to them (see course readings, ch. 8).
III. Establish Credibility
Identify the credentials or experiences that qualify you to address this topic as an authority (see course readings, ch. 8).
IV. State the Thesis
Present your purpose or thesis statement—a statement that encapsulates your speech’s main idea—here. State it as 1 complete sentence, with subject, verb, and complete thought (see course readings, ch. 8). 
V. Preview Your Main Points
Present a preview statement here. Briefly explain that you will now validate or prove the thesis by presenting Main Point 1 (state it), Main Point 2 (state it), Main Point 3 (state it), etc. Be sure to list each of the body section’s main points, in the order you will cover them.
Transition: Use a word, phrase, or sentence to notify your audience that you now will support your purpose or thesis by presenting the main points in their stated order and in greater detail (see course readings, ch. 7).
Body:
I. Main Point 1. State it as 1 complete, declarative sentence. Works with the other main points to develop the thesis statement. Be sure it consists with the chosen organizational pattern you identified above.
A. An example, illustration, statistic, comparison, quote from a properly cited expert source that supports or illustrates Main Point 1 (Parenthetical Citation, if this came from a source).
B. Another example, illustration, statistic, comparison, quote from a properly cited expert source that supports or illustrates Main Point 1 (Parenthetical Citation, if this came from a source).
C. If needed, another example, illustration, statistic, comparison, quotes from an expert, or other supportive material that supports or illustrates Main Point 1 (Parenthetical Citation, if this came from a source).
Transition: Use a word, phrase, or sentence to notify your audience that you are now transitioning from your first main point to your second main point (see course readings, ch. 7).
II. Main Point 2. State it as 1 complete, declarative sentence. Works with the other main points to develop the thesis statement. Be sure it consists with the chosen organizational pattern you identified above.
A. An example, illustration, statistic, comparison, quote from a properly cited expert source that supports or illustrates Main Point 2 (Parenthetical Citation, if this came from a source).
B. Another example, illustration, statistic, comparison, quote from a properly cited expert source that supports or illustrates Main Point 2 (Parenthetical Citation, if this came from a source).
C. If needed, another example, illustration, statistic, comparison, quotes from an expert, or other supportive material that supports or illustrates Main Point 2 (Parenthetical Citation, if this came from a source).
Transition: Use a word, phrase, or sentence to notify your audience that you are now transitioning from your second main point to your third main point (see course readings, ch. 7).
III. Main Point 3. State it as 1 complete, declarative sentence. Works with the other main points to develop the thesis statement. Be sure it consists with the chosen organizational pattern you identified above.
A. An example, illustration, statistic, comparison, quote from a properly cited expert source that supports or illustrates Main Point 3 (Parenthetical Citation, if this came from a source).
B. Another example, illustration, statistic, comparison, quote from a properly cited expert source that supports or illustrates Main Point 3 (Parenthetical Citation, if this came from a source).
C. If needed, another example, illustration, statistic, comparison, quotes from an expert, or other supportive material that supports or illustrates Main Point 3 (Parenthetical Citation, if this came from a source).
Other Main Points: These are optional, depending on the needs of your speech. If you use them, they function in the same way as the preceding points.
Transition: Use a word, phrase, or sentence to notify your audience that you are now transitioning into your conclusion (see course readings, ch. 7).
Conclusion:
I. Summarize Your Thesis and Main Points
Briefly restate your presentation’s thesis and main points (see course readings, ch. 8). Your wording should be very similar to the wording you used when previewing the main points in the introduction section and when presenting the main points in the body section.
II. End with a Clincher (see course readings, ch. 8).
Works Cited (if using MLA) or References (if using APA) or Bibliography (if using Turabian)
Using MLA, APA, or Turabian style, to present an alphabetized, properly formatted list of any sources that you cited in the outline. For a helpful online guide to proper formatting in each of these styles, see the Hacker Handbooks “Research and Documentation” site via this link (right-click and select “Open Hyperlink”). For automated source formatting assistance, see Landmark’s Citation Machine via this link (right-click and select “Open Hyperlink”).

Get Help Today

Struggling with this particular assignment? Learn how our team of professional writers can help you today.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *